Siyathemba, a modern suburb

Community News
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The relocation of the 514 Dingleton residents by Sishen to the new Siyathemba suburb was meant to pave way for the expansion of the South West pit of the mine is seen by many beneficiaries as a blessing in disguise.

 

Only a few people have cast low tone aspersions on the exercise that sought to bring a win-win legacy between the mine and its surrounding community. In a broad interview with the community already resident in Siyathemba, there was a collective resonance that the new houses built for them by Sishen mine were indeed an improvement of the infrastructure.

 

Most people believe the houses had all the mod cons that go with the pride of a decent house. Only a few, less than ten, people remained at the obsolete Dingleton in the belief that the offer made by Kumba to relocate them to Siyathemba was incommensurate with the mineral worth underneath their shanty town. An interview with the head of projects at Kumba, Mr George Maluleke, during a media visit to the new suburb he said that the mine made visible upgrades of Dingleton in the construction of Siyathemba.

 

“As a mine we relocated everything, including churches, clinics, personal businesses that belonged to individuals, schools and a police station and we are still going an extra mile to ensure that the community gets all the satisfaction. From the word go, we neither intended to dump nor isolate the Dingleton community. The mine has the belief and conviction that this community is part of the mining family. We have added multiple facilities in Siyathemba to embrace and enhance the modern way our society live”.

 

“I hear there are some people who remained adamant about the relocation exercise claiming more compensation money, in fact millions, how are you going to resolve the stalemate”

 

He continued, “We remain positive about the few people that remained in Dingleton and as negotiations continue we are optimistic they will weigh the odds. We respect their viewpoints because as people we don’t think alike. And should they decide to come to Siyathemba we are prepared to do the same, to relocate them with due respect and dignity”.

 

Concurring with his colleague was Sydney Ntili, a local economic development specialist with the mine, that the idea to relocate Dingleton community was and is still to attach respect and dignity to the people hence the infrastructure was greatly improved compared to what it was at Dingleton. He said that the mine won’t distance itself from the needs of Siyathemba. He said that the whole project was done within the dictates of the law pertaining to relocation of people where there are mining interests.

 

The media toured the new Siyathemba township accompanied by Kumba CEO,  Themba Mkwanazi, and his top officials. The township looked exquisite in its entirety, the residential area, tarred roads, clinic, library, shopping precinct, churches, creches and a magnificent modern police station etc.                        

 

 

 

 

The relocation of the 514 Dingleton residents by Sishen to the new Siyathemba suburb was meant to pave way for the expansion of the South West pit of the mine is seen by many beneficiaries as a blessing in disguise.

 

Only a few people have cast low tone aspersions on the exercise that sought to bring a win-win legacy between the mine and its surrounding community. In a broad interview with the community already resident in Siyathemba, there was a collective resonance that the new houses built for them by Sishen mine were indeed an improvement of the infrastructure.

 

Most people believe the houses had all the mod cons that go with the pride of a decent house. Only a few, less than ten, people remained at the obsolete Dingleton in the belief that the offer made by Kumba to relocate them to Siyathemba was incommensurate with the mineral worth underneath their shanty town. An interview with the head of projects at Kumba, Mr George Maluleke, during a media visit to the new suburb he said that the mine made visible upgrades of Dingleton in the construction of Siyathemba.

 

“As a mine we relocated everything, including churches, clinics, personal businesses that belonged to individuals, schools and a police station and we are still going an extra mile to ensure that the community gets all the satisfaction. From the word go, we neither intended to dump nor isolate the Dingleton community. The mine has the belief and conviction that this community is part of the mining family. We have added multiple facilities in Siyathemba to embrace and enhance the modern way our society live”.

 

“I hear there are some people who remained adamant about the relocation exercise claiming more compensation money, in fact millions, how are you going to resolve the stalemate”

 

He continued, “We remain positive about the few people that remained in Dingleton and as negotiations continue we are optimistic they will weigh the odds. We respect their viewpoints because as people we don’t think alike. And should they decide to come to Siyathemba we are prepared to do the same, to relocate them with due respect and dignity”.

 

Concurring with his colleague was Sydney Ntili, a local economic development specialist with the mine, that the idea to relocate Dingleton community was and is still to attach respect and dignity to the people hence the infrastructure was greatly improved compared to what it was at Dingleton. He said that the mine won’t distance itself from the needs of Siyathemba. He said that the whole project was done within the dictates of the law pertaining to relocation of people where there are mining interests.

 

The media toured the new Siyathemba township accompanied by Kumba CEO,  Themba Mkwanazi, and his top officials. The township looked exquisite in its entirety, the residential area, tarred roads, clinic, library, shopping precinct, churches, creches and a magnificent modern police station etc.