Anxiety has deservedly gotten its cure within the residents of Kuruman.
This comes after the final appoint-ment of a new municipal manager on September 29, 2017.
The former corporate director, Mr Martin Tsatsimpe, has taken the reigns from Mr Edward Ntefang with effect from October 01, 2017.
The succession process was de-scribed as of its own kind, as the transition was redolent with trans-parency and tolerance between the two officials.
Workers had a farewell party for the outgoing incumbent, a demon-stration that there was good rapport between the head of administration and his workforce. Mr Ntefang expressed his great appreciation for
Tsatsimpe has to bring “a new broom” in the whole system to turn around the fortunes of the strategic municipality in the region.
The last edition of the Kathu Ga-zette had an article regarding the indecisiveness in the appointment of municipal managers in the region. Coincidentally, the questions raised in the article, got a response in the nick of time and hopefully the re-maining municipalities shall soon get similar appointments.
Lastly, it is not about the prestige or accompanying perks of this office that these managers must pride themselves in, but how they trans-form the lives of residents using the tax payer's money prudently and ra-tionally without fingers in the till.

the support during his tenure and ad-vised workers to do their best to keep their jobs.
Touted as the father of the muni-cipality, Mr Ntefang, in his capacity as municipal manager, extended his role as an individual advisor to his colleagues on personal challenges.
Handing over the office keys to the new incumbent, Mr Ntefang wished Mr Martin Tsatsimpe a successful term.
On several occasions Mr Tsatsim-pe had been in the acting capacity, hence the vacancy left by his pre-decessor cushioned his experience, coupled with the relevant qualifica-tions, he joined fellow contestants in the position.
While it is not positional changes that the community wants, Mr Tsatsimpe has to bring “a new broom” in the whole system to turn around the fortunes of the strategic municipality in the region.
The last edition of the Kathu Ga-zette had an article regarding the indecisiveness in the appointment of municipal managers in the region. Coincidentally, the questions raised in the article, got a response in the nick of time and hopefully the re-maining municipalities shall soon get similar appointments.
Lastly, it is not about the prestige or accompanying perks of this office that these managers must pride themselves in, but how they trans-form the lives of residents using the tax payer's money prudently and ra-tionally without fingers in the till.


Gamagara local municipality recen-tly had the privilege to receive a visit from the project leader of the Karoo De-velopment Foundation (KDF), Profes-sor Doreen Atkinson, and her team, who came to consult the municipality about the development of a Kalahari heritage tourism route.
Professor Atkinson has already received some start-up funding for the project from the National Lotteries Commission.
According to Siyabonga Vukuza, the Se-nior Tourism Officer of Gamagara, the idea is to incorporate Kalahari towns and to identify and celebrate their rich heritage.
This history consist of numerous eleents, including archaeology, the San (Bushman) culture, the Tswana cultures, the Griqua culture, the missionaries and the Anglo-
Boer war. The “modern history”' stretches from around1800 onwards.
In the case of Kathu, various sites have been identified that can be developed at fairly low cost, though marketing and brand-ing will use full interventions.
The route will include towns as well as farms and game reserves in the surround-ing areas, not forgetting the Tlapeng during the Langberg war in Olifantshoek. There are links along the heritage route.
The towns are Olifantshoek, Kathu, Deben, Kuruman, Postmasburg and Da-niëlskuil.
The intention or aim is that when tourists visit our areas or towns, they should spend no less than two days with special focus on the heritage tourism route.

A week long workshop was conducted in the Kuruman town hall from Sep-tember 18 - 22, 2017 to spruce up wo-men's thinking towards capacitating their businesses. Funded by Tshipi ? Ntle Manga-nese mine and facilitated by Kuriti Business Consultancy, the theme of the workshop was “Innovative Thinking”.
nese mine and facilitated by Kuriti Business Consultancy, the theme of the workshop was “Innovative Thinking”.
According to Mr Bheki Mdakane the socio-economic and stakeholder engagement

Several mines in the Tsantsabane mu-nicipal area, most notably Kumba Iron Ore's Kolomela mine, Ass-mang's Beeshoek mine and Ringside Mi-ning, became the targets of a community's anger when hundreds of protesters em-barked on an unprecedented protest march on Friday 15 September 2017.
The march, organised by the Save Tsant-sabane Coalition (STC) and the Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF), in partnership with civil society, started about 2 kilometres from the Assmang Beeshoek mine and ended at the main entrance to the Bees-
hoek plant.
Tensions simmered when George Benja-min and Dr Ananias Radebe of Kolomela and Assmang mines respectively, ap-peared to receive the memorandum from the protesters, however, the crowd voiced their anger and chased the two gentleman away.
A dangerous stalemate ensued when protesters demanded the personal ap-pearance of mine managers.
The Public Order Police Unit were strain-ing to keep the crowd under control and also to negotiate with protest leaders and
mine representatives for an amicable solu-tion. A lack of ablution facilities and the long wait led to the crowd ultimately becoming unruly and the R385 road was barricaded. Assmang mine responded by deploying a heavily armed private security contingent and several water cannons.
The dangerous impasse was allayed when mine managers Aart van den Brink, Mark Oosthuizen and Sabelo Hlalatu finally ar-rived after approximately two hours to face the protesters.
A memorandum containing demands for employment, skills development and service delivery was read out loud by the firebrand leader of the STC, Alister Davids. The me-morandum contained, inter alia, the following demands:
    Dissolution of the Tsantsabane Labour Desk.
    A deliberate bias in employment recruit-ment towards original inhabitants of the Tsantsabane municipal area.
    Recruitment from labour sending areas to be stopped as a matter of extreme urgency
    Upskilling and rightskilling of local people.
    Investment in the placement and construc-tion of a community college and technical and vocational training in the Tsantsabane municipal area.
    To stop non-sensical and irrelevant pro-gramme offerings eg upholstery at Kolo-mela Skills Centre and invest in 1000 mi-
ning-related learnerships, bursaries, in-ternship and mentorship opportunties over the next three years
    To grow a new generation of black busi-ness leaders and entrepreneurs in the Tsantsabane municipal area.
    A multi-actor strategy to fight and expose endemic corruption at the Tsantsabane municipal area.
The mines were given five days to respond with a concrete programme of action on the demands. “Failure to do so, will leave us no other option but to target the productivity and operations of the stakeholders,” Mr Davids said. He lambasted the South African Police Services for not being impartial during march application processes.
Forty-year old Lenward Williams also join-ed the march. “I participate because last year Master Drilling retrenched only the local peo-ple from Postmasburg,” Mr Williams said.
Pensioner Agnes Letsalo delivered an em-otional plea on behalf of unemployed youth. “Our children are on drugs as a result of bore-dom – please employ them.”
At the end of the march, some veldfires were observed, but there was general uncer-tainty as to the cause. STC Communications

The Kathu Gazette approached the afore-mentioned mines for comment which will be published next week.

Approximately 50 security officers from Thorburn Security Solution in Kathu have still not returned to work, follow-ing a strike that commenced on 16 Septem-ber 2017, two weeks after the release of the new salary rates on 01 September 2017 as determined by Private Security Industry Re-gulatory Authority (Psira) and enforced by the Department of Labour.
The main grievance, is the monthly rate of R3414 for a security officer in the rural areas, whereas in the metro areas, the rate is R4100 per month.
According to the Human Resources Man-ager of Thorburn Security Solution, Ellence Monyela, the workers are on an illegal strike
since they are in contravention of the Labour Relations Act and guidelines as set out by the Sectoral Determination 6, the company and its codes, and are in breach of contract and the company's disciplinary codes.
After three ultimatums to return to work between the 16 and 17 September 2017, approximately 80% of the workforce return-ed to work. Thorburn however implemented a lock out for workers who did not return after the final deadline of 22 September 2017.
The non-returning employees were grant-ed permission to stage a legal demonstra-tion on 26 September 2017 at the Mapoteng Park where they handed over a memoran-dum to the management
Mr Monyela confirmed that all their claims in the memorandum about the overtime, unpaid hours, lack of promotions etc etc are completely unfounded as Thorburn Security Solution conforms to all the provisions of the Sectoral Determination, is audited four times annually by the Department of Labour and due promotions are made regularly.
He said that the workers who have not returned to work are still on lock out until they avail them-selves to the compa-ny.

As part of women's month, Assmang Khumani Mine embarked on an initiative to develop 30% or more black women-owned small businesses based in the Northern Cape, during the month of August. 
Beneficiaries from the Northern Cape that responded to the advert, have registered for the workshop and Ms Patience Patsanza from Mudzi Business Consulting in Pretoria, facilitated the 3-day workshop from 28 - 30 August 2017 at Uitkoms Guesthouse.  Beneficiaries amongst others received  training in small business management, identifying of opportunities, business planning, financial management, marketing and HR management. 
A total of 47 SMME companies qualified for this opportunity and in total, 70 delegates attended the workshop.
It seemed like a lot of worthful information was shared with these small business owners, giving them the opportunity to develop their businesses becoming bigger and better!

Four schools, three primary ones and one high school received school fur-niture from Kathu Solar Park's Licia-star and its subsidiary, Kelebogile Trust, on September 15, 2017.
The first recipient, Mapoteng Primary School in Kuruman, received 140 double desks and 280 chairs, followed by Kuduma-ne Primary School in Seodin with 140 dou-ble desks and 140 chairs, Phakane High School in Kagung received 137 double desks and 274 chairs with Maekaelelo Pri-mary School in Olifanshoek who received 150 double tables with 300 chairs.
The assistance is earmarked to benefit about 2164 learners where desks were be-coming a big challenge due to wear and tear. The assistance was rendered accord-ing to the individual needs of each school.
The donor also provided stationery mate-rial to cater for the current examinations.
Handing over the furniture was the re-presentative from Kelebogile Trust Ms Daleen Botha who is the community de-
velopment officer and Ms Jesmien Wapad - the community liaison officer for Kathu So-lar Park.
Ms Botha said that the trust, an arm of Li-ciastar, was established to look into the de-velopment needs of the community as its social responsibility. “Kelebogile Trust will cater for the community as a plough back responsibility for as long as the solar project continues its operations in this area.”
The school principal of Kudumane Pri-mary School Mr Kganelo Milton Moremi and the chairperson for the school govern-ing board Ms Keorapetse Poppy Ntidi con-curred that the donation was a very good gesture by the organisation.
Councillor Dineonyana Mpata for ward six also appreciated the high level of com-mitment being demonstrated by the solar project organisations. She advised the school authorities and learners to take care of the furniture so that many learners yet to attend the schools could benefit.            

Notice

Dear Readers Please take note of Our annual shut down.

Closing 8 December 2017

Opening 08 January 2018

Season's greetings to you all !